Category Archives: Information

Intellus Learning OER Discovery and Student Engagement Software

A portion of the AB 798 Textbook Affordability grant funds have been used to pilot the Intellus Learning OER software which allows faculty to find OER materials including ADA compliant videos, crawl many of the SBVC Library databases, and other Creative Commons licensed educational materials. Faculty can download resources and web links for later examination and use, migrate directly into Canvas class shells and evaluate student engagement with resources.

To access the Intellus Learning software, email rpires@valleycollege.edu for log-in information.

The following are tutorial video from Intellus Learning. One-one training and webinars are also available for faculty: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLkCVCCCEpkD1y7VaJOehmtaceHIz-BjhW

Intellus Learning Overview

 

 

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Annual 2017 OER Babson Research Group Survey Results

Report available at:

www.onlinelearningsurvey.com/oer.html

Opening the Textbook Educational Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2017, Babson Survey Research Group Report is released under a Creative Commons Attribution CC-BY-SA

Executive Summary

Responses from over 2,700 U.S. faculty paint both a “Good news” and a “Bad news” picture for the role of open educational resources (OER) in U.S. higher education. Both sides of the equation are clearly evident in the responses from higher education teaching faculty who had recently selected required curricula materials (primarily textbooks) their course.

The levels of awareness of OER, the licensing tied to it, and overall adoption of OER materials, remains low. Only 10% of faculty reported that they were “Very aware” of open educational resources, with 20% saying that they were “Aware.” Awareness of Creative Commons licensing also remains low, with only 19% of faculty reporting that they are “Very aware.” Measures that combine both dimensions are even lower, with 8% classified as “Very aware” and 17% as “Aware” on a joint measure of OER and of Creative Commons licensing awareness.

Faculty continue to report significant barriers to OER adoption. The most serious issues continue to be the effort needed to find and evaluate suitable material. Nearly one-half of all faculty report that “there are not enough resources for my subject” (47%), and it is “too hard to find what I need” (50%). In light of this, the reported level of adoption of open-licensed textbooks (defined as either public domain or Creative Commons) of only 9% is not a surprise. Many faculty members also voice concerns about the long-term viability of open educational resources, and worry about who will keep the materials current.

That said, there is also considerable cause for optimism among those who support OER. The awareness and adoption levels may be low, but they also show steady year-to-year improvements. For example, the open-licensed textbook adoption rate of 9% for 2016-17 represents a substantial increase over the rate of 5% for 2015-16. Likewise, awareness of both Creative Commons licensing and OER itself has increased each year. OER also addresses a key concern of many faculty: the cost of materials. A majority of faculty classify cost as “Very important” for their selection of required course materials.

Faculty report that their required textbooks have an average price of $97, and only 22% say that they are “Very satisfied” with that cost. It is therefore not surprising that most faculty report that not all of their students buy all the required texts for their class, with only a third saying that 90% or more of their students have purchased the required textbook.

A particular area of OER success is among large enrollment introductory-level courses. These courses touch the largest numbers of students, are often taught in multiple sections (66%), and are typically required for some subset of students (79%). Faculty teaching these  courses were presented with a list of the most commonly used commercial textbooks (up to twelve) for their specific course, along with an open text alternative from OpenStax, a non-profit OER publisher based out of Rice University.  The rate of adoption of OpenStax textbooks among faculty teaching large enrollment courses is now at 16.5%, a rate which rivals that of most commercial textbooks. This is a substantial increase over the rate observed last year (10.8%). Users of OpenStax textbooks also had levels of satisfaction equal to their peers teaching introductory level courses who had selected commercial textbooks.

These adoptions address concerns about cost as well: faculty who did not select an OpenStax textbook reported an average cost of $125 for the required textbook, while those who did select an OpenStax text reported an average cost of $31.

The OpenStax results among large enrollment introductory-level courses shows that OER can be successful. OpenStax has been able to reach penetration levels equal to most of their commercial competitors, with equal levels of faculty satisfaction, in a very short time. This comes amid continuing concerns on the part of faculty about the limited nature of OER materials, particularly the lack of associated materials like tests, quizzes, and homework assignments, that are typically provided by commercial alternatives.\

The OpenStax model has also successfully addressed another faculty concern: the desire for print over digital. Faculty continue to report that their students prefer printed materials, and OpenStax provides this alternative in addition to a freely distributed digital version. The results show that when you deal directly with the top faculty concerns of finding and evaluating potential OER options, OER can be as successful as commercial alternatives. Open Stax has done this by using an adoption and distribution model that is very similar to that of commercial publishers, with nicely formatted printed copies available for students in their normal bookstore. One lesson from the OpenStax results is that you need to reach individual faculty members in order to be successful.  Two-thirds (67%) of all faculty reported that they were the sole decision maker for the new or revised course material, while an additional 22% of faculty engaged in a group decision. Faculty have a well-proven model for selecting their teaching materials, and any new player will have to be successful within that model.

OpenStax’s success is not complete, however. Initial adoption has primarily been among faculty who are willing to embrace new teaching styles, have greater willingness to move away from the traditional lecture style for teaching, and have a higher appreciation for digital materials. It is unclear if faculty with more traditional approaches, or greater reliance on associated materials, will follow in the same numbers. It is also not clear if the OpenStax model will work outside of large enrollment classes. A mature OER distribution channel stocked with well-developed, high-quality options can address two of the most common factors cited by faculty when selecting educational resources: the need for comprehensive content and resources that are easy to find. OER has a district advantage for the remaining top concern: the cost to the student.

Questions remain, however. Will there be sufficient adoption in smaller classes to support the production and updating of OER textbook alternatives? Is there enough volume in this market to support other OER publishers?

OER and College Financial Readiness

The 1,000 Dreams Fund is a non-profit organization with a mission of providing financial support to women attending college. Recently, the organization surveyed 1,092 young college females and males, some of which were recent college graduates about college cost expectations (Campus Technology).

The survey found that among those that did not complete college, finances were an issue, with 60% of Hispanic students who did not complete college, reporting financial limitations. Unexpected college costs were also more of an issue for females than males (Campus Technology).

The report concluded that the unexpected college costs which include textbooks, housing, food, school exams and fees, and moving expenses are more likely to keep first generation students, and females from participating in extracurricular college activities, and internships, both which are advantageous when recent college graduates enter the workforce (Campus Technology).

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Source: Campus Technology, Dian Schaffhauser, 10/30/17

OER and other properly licensed free course materials can assist students especially those who are at risk of leaving college early to not only satisfactorily complete their goals but can also be beneficial in providing opportunities for these students to engage in campus extracurricular activities, internships, tutoring, and other student success behaviors outside of the classroom. This potential benefit of having faculty use OER is not often examined or taken into account when institutions consider saving students money on textbooks costs through openly licensed course materials. The findings from this 1,000 Dreams Fund survey can also be helpful when designing Zero Textbook Cost degree (ZTCD) pathways.

Use of Free Course Materials Is on the Rise

New reports show that openly licensed resources and other cost saving behaviors are making an impact on the high cost of textbooks. Business Wire reported that student spending on textbooks and course materials has declined by approximately 15% over the last decade or $100. In 2016-2017 the average spending on textbooks and course materials was approximately $543. Various reports contribute this decline to more smarter student behaviors rather than a decline in textbook pricing (Business Wire).

According to the National Association of College Stores, while the overwhelming majority of college students purchase new traditionally copyrighted textbooks, 25% of students in spring 2017, and up from 19% in 2016, accessed free course materials.

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Source: National Association of College Stores

The increase in the use of free course materials is most likely related to the OER outreach efforts taking place at many colleges and universities. In its 2016-2017 Connect OER Report, SPARC found that among its member institutions of higher education, libraries are the most engaged institutional sources of OER information, and about half of the institutions have a staff or faculty with OER related responsibilities (SPARC, 2017). The survey conducted by SPARC of its members also found that the most common OER program is funded through grants, with most of them beginning in 2016 and 2017 (SPARC, 2017).

engagement

Source: Connect OER Annual Report, SPARC, 2016-2017

What is Open Pedagogy?

Open pedagogy is a relatively new term having emerged out of the open educational resources/open education movement. David Wiley who coined the concept of the 5Rs to understand the ways in which Creative Commons open licenses can be utilized, also believes that the definition of open pedagogy should be understood within the context of the 5Rs: retain, reuse, revise, and remix, and redistribute open content (David Wiley).

Rajiv Jhangiani encourages us to think about open pedagogy within the context of the what as illustrated in the following slide.

OpenPedagogy

Open pedagogy through the use of open educational resources is a paradigm shift in that the values and tools of openness enable students to be active creators of knowledge as opposed to passive consumers of knowledge. “All too often we are giving students cut flowers when we should be teaching them to grow their own plants” John W. Gardner.

In a presentation by CCCOER on the topic of open pedagogy, a question to consider: how does the instructor’s relationship to material change, if we’re changing the relationship between student and material?

The thoughts this question inspires are provoking, stimulating, challenging, and liberating.

Students as active creators is different from students as active learners.

“And where we claim to value being ‘student-centered’ when in practice faculty, course content, accreditation or testing requirements, and budgetary concerns drive the learning process far more than students” – Rajiv S. Jhangian.

What does open pedagogy look like in the classroom?  Imaginations free to wonder lead to endless possibilities.

Additional Open Pedagogy Resources

Year of Open 2017: What is Open Pedagogy?
https://www.yearofopen.org/april-open-perspective-what-is-open-pedagogy/

What an Open Pedagogy Class Taught Me About Myself
https://thechcexplored.wordpress.com/2017/04/26/what-an-open-pedagogy-class-taught-me-about-myself/

Launching OER Degree Pathways

Achieving the Dream is a non-profit organization working to improve student success for community college students across the country through leadership, support, innovative strategies, and projects.

The organization awarded grant funding as part of its Open Educational Resources (OER) Degree Initiative to 38 community colleges across 13 states to develop zero textbook cost degree pathways. Recently Achieving the Dream detailed progress on its initiative in a report titled: Launching OER Degree Pathways: An Early Snapshot of Achieving the Dream’s OER Degree Initiative and Emerging Lessons.

Here are some of the main findings from the report: Continue reading